Tag: color (page 1 of 2)

3 Ways to Decorate with Red

Red is a color often associated with love, passion, and intensity.  As such, it can be an overwhelming–or even intimidating–shade to decorate with.  But fear not!  Following are 3 tried-and-true strategies for decorating with red…

Make a Singular Statement

Decorating with red doesn’t have to be a full-blown commitment.  Sometimes, a single scarlet piece or coat of red paint will deliver the intended effect.

Decorating with Red | Motley Decor

A shiny, candy apple red staircase is all that is needed to make a statement in this home.

This traditional home benefits from modern touches–like these accents chairs: two cherries on top of the ice cream sundae that is this room.

Even amongst other vibrant hues, a cardinal skirted table imparts a cheery, impactful effect in this colorful Connecticut home.

This hallway is punctuated by red fretwork panels, providing the space’s only pop of color and stealing all of the attention.

Group Red Accents

Red pieces also tend to look good en masse.  A grouping of red furnishings or accessories will satisfy a more intense appetite for vermillion.

How to Decorate with Red | Group Red Accents | MotleyDecor.com

This entry by Christian Lyon features a red vignette, in which, layers of the shade–clustered tightly together–are visually greater than the sum of their parts.

Modern art, python skin, and watercolor blooms are unlikely companions, combined with enviable confidence in this space and united by a common rosy hue.

Ruby reigns supreme in this Dallas jewelry designer’s dining room.  From the curtains, to the seat cushions, to the various vessels; splashes of red keep the eye moving around the room.

Fabrizio Rollo is no stranger to color and here he takes on lipstick red.  While this is not a red room per se, red is certainly the dominant color.  The complex mix of neutrals and foils to the shade  make it all the more enjoyable.

Sheath the Walls and Bring in Neutrals

Unlike other hues, red can act as the main event and the backdrop, as evidenced by the rooms that follow.  What else do they have in common?  Restraint.  Red walls are the only instance of color in these spaces.  The furniture, art, and accessories are largely neutral.  This keeps the color focus on the rainbow’s top shade and simultaneously highlights the textures, patterns, lusters, and sculptural qualities of the rooms’ furnishings.

3 Ways to Decorate with Red | 3 of 3 | Sheath the Walls

This fire engine red foyer by Nick Olsen makes a stunning first impression, especially when paired with chic black and white.

Here, poppy-tinged walls beautifully offset an antique console table stocked with treasures.

And lastly, red lacquer walls are one of the few treatments that can withstand the drama of this room: an intricately carved mantel, cast peacock chairs, leopard upholstery, gold cocktail tables–these furnishings call for an equally intense envelopment.  Rather than competing on pattern, shape or shine; it’s a dose of crimson that answers that call.

Ready to start decorating with red?  Either way, Happy Valentine’s Day!

The 6 Best Color Combinations Using Pantone’s 2017 Color of the Year, Greenery

When Pantone revealed that “Greenery” would be their 2017 color of the year, it felt like a personal victory.  Not because I had predicted Pantone’s choice, but because green is my jam!  (And it’s a shade that so rarely gets its due.)  Not only is green representative of hope, healing, and nature; but it also plays well with so many other colors.  Here are the 6 best color combinations and palette ideas for incorporating “Greenery” into your home in 2017.

Mix with True Neutrals

Greenery couples crisply with true neutrals: black, white, or any shade of gray.  Whether it provides a “pop of color” in a monochromatic room or assumes a more dominate role , Greenery won’t disappoint in the presence of  ash, charcoal, and carbon.

6 Color Combos Using Greenery, Pantone's 2017 Color of the Year

A waxy apple green shade similar to the 2017 color of the year coats this kitchen.  A graphic floor of green and black demands attention while white, stainless steel, and other black touches mingle effortlessly.

6 Color Combos Using Greenery, Pantone's 2017 Color of the Year

Black and white wallpaper makes a statement in this dining room–matched in intensity by drapes and upholstery in vivid yellow-green.

6 Color Combos Using Greenery, Pantone's 2017 Color of the Year

Silver–a metallic variant of gray–also compliments Pantone’s pick, as evidenced by this swanky bar.

Add Moody Hues

Greenery’s zesty properties are well tempered by moody hues.  The mix creates both tension and balance, conjuring interiors with mystique and allure.

6 Color Combos Using Greenery, Pantone's 2017 Color of the Year

Grasshopper green curtains are unexpected addition to this elegant space with dark walls, cognac leather, and caramel wood finishes.  Still, the bright color seems an appropriate hue to usher in the natural light.

6 Color Combos Using Greenery, Pantone's 2017 Color of the Year

Navy and mulberry welcome the electricity of 2017’s color of the year.  Case in point: Veronica Swanson Beard’s living room, photographed by Harper’s Bazaar.

6 Color Combos Using Greenery, Pantone's 2017 Color of the Year

A moody landscape and portobello walls offset chartreuse chairs in this dining room.  The color combination works so well that all accessories are kept neutral as to not interfere: a black urn, white ceramics, and glittering crystals overhead.

Pair it with Purple

If you caught my post on Benjamin Moore’s 2017 Color of the Year, then this pairing will come as no surprise.  Violet and citrus–aka Greenery and Shadow–make pretty partners.

The 6 Best Color Combinations Using Greenery, Pantone Color of the Year 2017

This feminine salon is largely neutral–save the pistachio green chairs and amethyst purple cushions.  The subdued palette imparts an air of serenity with just enough color to be interesting.  Check out Violet and Citrus to see more green and purple pairings.

Lemon Lime

In interior design–as in food–lemon and lime are often found together.  They are neighbors on the color wheel and the reigning monarchs of the citrus kingdom.  Although both are strong in their acid content, they can be used in tandem because the combination poses no tension.  The two marry well.

How to Decorate with Pantone's 2017 Color of the Year, Greenery | Lemon Lime | Motley Decor

Jane Scott Hodges’ home is a gorgeous example of the power of lemon and lime.  Decorated by her college friend, Gwen Driscoll, the parlor balances tartness with creamy vanilla tones.  The walls are an almost shocking shade in the vein of Greenery, subdued by butter yellow curtains.  A more intense incarnation of yellow pepper some of the chairs, which is–again–countered by tame wood finishes, whitewashed and weathered Swedish antiques, and layer after layer of  ivory textiles.

Fellow New Orleans native, Julia Reed took a similar approach in her sitting room.  While settling on a softer shade of lime for the walls, she opted for bolder, lemony drapes.

Of course, lemon and lime also make great accent colors with little sacrificed in the way of impact, as seen here.

Mixed Greens

Lavishing varied shades of green on a room is one of my favorite approaches to color.  Again, if you caught my previous post, Decorating with Green as a Neutral, you know what I’m talking about.  So naturally, I had to include this as one of the 6 best palette ideas for using Greenery.  I hope the following images will convince you…

6 Color Combos Using Greenery, Pantone's 2017 Color of the Year

An updated verdure mural with on-trend palms and velvet upholstery in two shades run the gamut of greens at Monsieur Bleu.

6 Color Combos Using Greenery, Pantone's 2017 Color of the Year

Tone on tone stripes, malachite arm chairs, and copious foliage adorn this handsome mantel.

6 Color Combos Using Greenery, Pantone's 2017 Color of the Year

This mineral-studded library boasts hues reminiscent of both emeralds and peridots and–appropriately–belongs to a jewelry designer.

Abandon the Concept of  a Palette All Together

As I said in the beginning of this post, Pantone’s Color of the Year for 2017 plays well with many colors.  In fact, it’s so versatile that no preordained palette is necessary…

How to Decorate with Pantone's 2017 Color of the Year, Greenery | Motley Decor

In this living room, the Greenery is right at home with both pastels and the more intense colors  contained in the gallery wall.

With walls the color of a ripe Anjou pears, any color is welcome in this eclectic living room.  Black furnishings set the boundaries of the space, containing a magenta rug, brown leather Chesterfield sofa, scarlet cushion, blue and white ginger jars, and art in a spectrum of colors.

Green and gold wallpaper serves as a neutral backdrop amidst colorful bedding, mixed metals, and a variety of wood finishes in florist, Maurice Harris‘s verdant bedroom.

I hope you are as enthusiastic as I am for the colorful possibilities that 2017 brings.  It seems more vivid and saturated hues are on the horizon this year.  Greenery and Shadow are eclipsing last year’s softer selections of Rose Quartz & Serenity and Simply White.  Color lovers are rejoicing and I am among them.

I also hope that the 6 palette ideas suggested in this post have inspired you to consider introducing this juicy olivine shade into your home–particularly if you’ve shied away from greens in the past.  But, above all, I wish you all of the things that Greenery represents in 2017: hope, healing, and the awe-inspiring power of Mother Nature.

4 Palette Ideas for Benjamin Moore’s 2017 Color of the Year, Shadow

Benjamin Moore’s choice of Shadow (a smoked amethyst purple) was a surprising selection for 2017’s color of the year and a drastic departure from last year’s “Simply White”.  Still, I for one, am excited to see a moody jewel tone take center stage in the coming year and hope its a harbinger of more colorful, dramatic interiors to come.  Naturally, I’ve been bouncing around palette ideas in my head.  After much thought, 4 color combos bubble to the top.  Here they are…

Shades of Gray & Shadow

Both complex hues with plenty of depth, gray and purple are a match made in heaven, creating a sexy, mysterious atmosphere.  In this pairing, I’d give precedence to gray, layering shade upon shade with limited pops of deep, dark Shadow and lighter notes of dusty lavender.

The other key to pulling of this color duo is to pile on the lustrous textures.  Think: velvet, antiqued mirrors, mother of pearl, and chrome…

Violet & Citrus

Benjamin Moore’s 2017 color of the year, Shadow isn’t just purple.  It’s a sultry, saturated, slightly-more-blue-than-red tone.  Thus, it’s complimentary color is a somewhere-between-yellow-and-green hue.  These two botanical-themed shades of violet and citrus are meant to be.

Of course, complimentary colors can be overwhelming or even jarring.  So, be sure to balance the intensity and even the amount of the two hues to match the mood you’re looking to create in particular room.  Hedge the duo with plenty of neutrals for a more relaxing atmosphere.  Or throw restraint to the wind and saturate a room with the two colors for a more energizing effect.

Amethyst & Sapphire

4 Palette Ideas for Using Benjamin Moore's Shadow | Sapphire & Amethyst

via OKL

4 Palette Ideas for Using Benjamin Moore's Shadow | Sapphire & Amethyst

David Collins

A cool blue also plays nicely with the 2017 color of the year and–contrary to the last pairing–makes for a soothing, tension-free setting.

Of  course, a little tension is necessary.  Thus, make sure to mix in some warm neutrals like rattan, burl wood, cognac leather, or even tortoise shell.

Every Shade of Purple

4 Palette Ideas for Benjamin Moore's 2016 Color of the Year: Shadow | Layers of Purple

Hunt Slonem

Layering Shades of Purple | Shadow, Benjamin Moore's 2017 Color of the Year | 4 Palette Ideas | MotleyDecor.com

via AD

Then again, purple is a shade that begs to be layered and Shadow is no exception.  Nearly every tint–from lilac to orchid–can be used in concert, as evidenced by the overwhelmingly violet interiors above.

If you take this route, commit.  Contrast light shades of purple with dark.  Mix ultra saturated tones like aubergine with more delicate hues like wisteria.  Oscillate between indigo and merlot.  Diversity is key.

4 Ways to Decorate with Yellow Inspired by Emmy Gowns

Yellow gowns dazzled on the red carpet of the 2016 Emmy Awards.  Shades ranging from lemonade to dandelion compliment a variety of skin tones and are having a moment in fashion.  As always, fashion informs interior design–or perhaps the reverse is true.  In any case, here are 4 ways to decorate with yellow inspired by gowns worn to the 68th Emmy Awards.

If you love Angela Bassett’s acid-dijon-yellow, batwinged frock…

…then consider taking an equally fearless approach to decor and slather your walls in a bold shade a la Kim Bachmann…

4 Ways to Decorate with Yellow Inspired by the 68th Emmy Awards

via OKL

If you prefer a more citrusy shade of yellow enhanced by ornate, feminine details much like Lianne La Havas’ dress…

4 Ways to Decorate with Yellow Inspired by Emmy Dresses

via Vogue

…then take a page out of Thom Filicia’s book and put citron paint to statement-making furniture…

Yellow Decor Inspired by the 2016 Emmys

via AD

Or, if you have a sunny disposition and a penchant for throwbacks like the Unbreakable Kimmy Schmidt aka Ellie Kemper who donned this patterned, retro number…

…then embrace vintage pattern in a subtle sulfur hue…

4 Ways to Decorate with Yellow Inspired by the 2016 Emmys Red Carpet

via OKL

However, if it was Mandy Moore’s ruffled marigold gown that caught your eye at the 2016 Emmys…

Inspired by the 68th Emmys: 4 Ways to Decorate with Yellow

via usmagazine

…then go goldenrod in an unexpected way like this beaded chandelier…

Inspired by Yellow Gowns on the Red Carpet of the 2016 Emmy Wards...4 Ways to Decorate with Yellow

Which approach do you prefer?

Decorgasm: Scott Maddux’s Masterful Command of Color

When Scott Maddux was hired by a London couple to breathe new life into their newly acquired 6 bedroom home, the creative brief called for “exuberant color”.  Knowing this, one might expect the outcome to contain super saturated walls, jewel-toned upholstery, and neon accessories.  However, the actual result was much more subtle.  Even so, exuberance was not sacrificed.

The Living Room

Decorgasm: Scott Maddux's Masterful Command of Color

At this end of the living room, color starts brewing in the custom kilim rug of grapefruit pink, lime green, and oceanic turquoise.  Having established the color palette, the rug then informs the upholstery, sending color upward to the vibrantly patterned Otto Schultz chairs and dusty blue Ico Parisi sofa.  The abundance of pink in the room casts a rosy glow onto the faux parchment walls.  The drapes react similary, assuming a shade somewhere between beige and blush.  Thus, the room’s color becomes increasingly less intense as the eye travels upward–right up to the white ceiling and glass Vilhelm Lauritzen  chandelier.

This Is How To Use Color In Your Home | Decorgasm: Scott Maddux's Masterful Command of Color | Motley Decor

At the other end of the living room, Maddux employs a similar formula.  He anchors the space with the aforementioned rug’s twin and again includes colorful seating options.  What looks to be an Egyptian revival settee recalls the denim blue of the sofa from the previous picture.  And, once again, we see a lively patterned chair.

Still, this end encompasses some bolder strokes.  A two-sided, kidney-shaped sofa is dressed in lustrous key-lime green silk and tufted all over for extra light-reflecting opportunities.  In addition, two Peter Lanyon abstract paintings flank the fireplace, injecting the room with moodier hues like navy blue.  The blackened metal frame of the Marianna Kennedy mirror reinforces those darker shades.  Even the cast-terrazzo stools (from Maddux Creative) contain bits that echo the pinks and blues of the room.

In short, Scott Maddux has clearly lavished great care on the application of color.  The palette is restricted to three color families that dance around the room and create rhythm.  Bright hues are balanced by shadowy counterparts and easily influenced neutrals provide the stage on which all these hues perform.

The Dining Room

This is How to Decorate with Color! | Decorgasm: Scott Maddux's Masterful Command of Color | Motley Decor

The dining room’s color strategy turns that of the living on its head.  Here, color originates from above.  Inspired by the art of Ben Nicholson, color pervades the dining room in the form of floating rectangles, starting with the ceiling painted by artist Isabelle Day.  From there, the theme trickles downward in the colored glass panels of the sliding door that separates the dining room from the kitchen.  A pendant light by Johanna Grawunder consists of transparent, overlapping boxes that perfectly mimic the motif in three, increasingly intense colors.

Right angles dominate not only the color blocks, but also the furnishings.  Wall sculptures and a Paul Evans dining table repeat the rectangular shapes from above, but in stunning  neutrals of chrome, brass, and burl wood.  Scott Maddux uses these familiar silhouettes relate the neutral ground level of the room to its more colorful stratosphere.

The Entrance Hall

This is How to Decorate with Color! | Decorgasm: Scott Maddux's Masterful Command of Color | Motley Decor

The entry hall is home to some unexpected color combinations and nuanced details.  At first glance, the olive in the silk stair runner and cotton candy-colored fur of the bench surprise the eye.  However, the blue marble floor insets and similarly painted edges of the wall somehow reconcile the two opposing shades.  The green marble in the floor marries the runner to the artwork above the bench.  Gilded moldings, sconces, and the banister converse with the mustard touches in the runner.  Although the walls are white, color is carefully layered and peppered throughout the space in such a way that keeps the eye moving–uncovering those discreet details along the way.

What can I say?  Scott Maddux knows how to use color.  He doesn’t slap you in the face with it.  Rather, his command of the rainbow is marked by finesse.  Although this home is dominated by light neutrals, color is still the focus.  It is, perhaps, easier to appreciate in the presence of benign, non-competing hues.  Still, there’s enough diversity in the shades here to allow for chemical reactions between them.  Indeed, the request for “exuberant color” was executed with mastery.

These are just a few of the rooms pictured in Elle Decor’s coverage of this beautiful and eclectic home.  There are even a couple of rooms that are completely neutral (but no less impressive).  I encourage to check out the rest.

An Exercise in Tolerance: 5 Design Choices I Had to Learn to Like

Every now and then, I get it into my head that I don’t like something–some element commonly found in interior design.  It’s a mild, dispassionate dislike, but a prejudice just the same.  So, when that list of “things I don’t like” gets too long, I challenge myself to change my own mind.  Thus, in the spirit of tolerance, here are some design choices that I used to dislike and have recently learned appreciate…

Parsons Tables

I know that they are classics in design, but they are exceedingly minimalist for my taste.  Why would I buy something so plain when I could buy something…exciting?  I’m generally drawn to tables with pedestal bases and sculptural qualities.  But then…I came across this image…

This blue Parsons table energizes this otherwise neutral, traditional-leaning dining room.  It’s bright coat of paint and severe right angles are the perfect foil to the curvy, carved Portuguese dining chairs.  Clearly, I was wrong about Parsons style tables.

Damask

Damask patterns are ubiquitous in “old world” interiors.  However, in contemporary interiors, they often seem contrived and out of place to my eye.  I often cringe when I see them in modern settings.  But again, I was able to prove myself wrong…

Admittedly, I have a hard time articulating why I love this dining room so much, but I do.  I love the chunky crystal pieces and ruby red chairs.  I also can’t help but admire the subtle ombre effect and moody hues of the–well what do you know?–damask wallpaper.  Wrong again!

Plaid

Perhaps I’m extra judgmental when it comes to patterns, because plaid is another print that often turns me off.  It feels very specific to me–very reminiscent of either Christmas or Rob Roy or lumberjacks.

But this room recalls none  of those things.  It feels fresh, chic, and just quirky enough to be interesting.  The plaid backdrop is actually quite lovely.  I’ve changed my attitude towards plaid so drastically, in fact, that I started a Pinterest board around the theme called Clash of the Tartans.  (I love a good pun!)

The Color Pink

I know that, in 2016 (the year that Pantone hailed rose quartz as one of the colors of the year), it’s ridiculous to still dislike pink, but I’ve avoided it since the ’90s.  I’m not sure why.  So, you can imagine my disbelief when I found myself swept up in the blush craze.

An Exercise in Tolerance | 5 Design Choices I Had to Learn to Like | Pink

via Lonny

Could these ballet-slipper-pink chinoiserie panels and stools be any prettier?  But it’s not just the barely-pink blush I’ve been admiring…

I’m completely smitten with this super-saturated, hot pink foyer as well.  Again, this new-found love inspired another Pinterest board.

Upholstered Ottomans Used as Coffee Tables

If you ask me: contrast is key.  And, since coffee table are usually placed in front of upholstered sofas, doesn’t it make more sense to have a table with a distinct textural contrast?  Metal, glass, lucite, and wood are far more common (likely because they are better) alternatives.  But not always…not always…

How cool is the zebra ottoman?  It’s like an elevated rug.  With its unique shape and striking pattern, it makes a fantastic focal point, upon which, books and bowls are right at home.  You probably saw this one coming, but I also now have an Upholstered Ottomans board on Pinterest.

Maybe you should just follow me on Pinterest?  I promise to always keep an open mind and heart, pinning beautiful images in spite of any preconceived notions I may have errantly picked up along the way.  I leave you with that thought for the day.  Make it a great one!

 

Decorating with Green as a Neutral

Recently, I informed my husband that I wanted to paint our bedroom entirely green–even the ceiling.

“What kind of green?” he asked.

“The color of wild tobacco.” I replied.

He frowned, still not knowing what color I had in mind.  Gently, I reminded him of the waxy-green plants with little, yellow trumpet flowers that we often come across while hiking.

“It’ll be like sleeping in mother nature’s womb.” I assured him.  “What could be more peaceful than that?”

“OK.” he agreed, still frowning and unconvinced.  And so it was settled.  He had given me the green light, so to speak.

Since then, I’ve tested nearly a dozen different paint shades and countless fabric samples.  Weeks later, the only thing I know for certain is that green is a color that begs to be layered.  Emerald longs for peridot.  Chartreuse yearns for sage.  Olive craves verdigris.

In essence, green is a neutral.  What’s more, green is mother nature’s go-to neutral and she has dozens of shades up her mossy sleeves.

Decorating with green as a neutral | Motley Decor

Decorator Ahmad Sardar-Afkhami expressed a similar sentiment to Architectural Digest, saying, “I was always frustrated working with green, and I couldn’t really figure out why. One day I had an epiphany that the human eye is accustomed to seeing the nuanced variation of green in nature, so a single shade can look unnatural and jarring. I began to use many shades of green together, and the effect is very restful and beautiful.”

Judging by the room he designed above, I’d say he finally nailed it.

Decorating with Green as a Neutral | Kelly Wearstler, The Viceroy Miami | Motley Decor

Kelly Wearstler took the same approach when decorating the Viceroy in Miami.  As you can see in the picture above, Wearstler employed green shades: lime, jade, and celadon in generous quantities that dominate the room and act as a neutral.

Decorating with Green as a Neutral | Benjamin Dhong, House Beautiful | Motley Decor

This library by Benjamin Dhong (featured by House Beautiful) is another excellent example of decorating with green as a neutral.  Kelly green, kiwi, and citron bounce around the room, creating a harmonious rhythm of steady often-found-in-nature greens.  The result is both beautiful and soothing.

Decorating with Green as a Neutral | Mint & Malachite | Motley Decor

This powder room (found on Veranda) runs the green gamut from mint to malachite.  With such dense greenery, it’s the blue and white Chinese vases that add the “pop of color” to this space.

Decorating with Green | Green as a Neutral | Motley Decor

Anouska Hempel’s dining room of her English manor (via Architectural Digest) is an ode to decorating with green.  It resembles a moss-covered meadow in the middle of the jungle.  Nearly every possible hue between blue and yellow is represented.  The walls are a deep sea green.  The drapes are emerald.  The tablecloth is a grassy velvet.  Cabbages and artichokes abound.  Leayf botanical prints are hung with care.  In short, it’s a green dream come true.  Mother nature would be proud.

If you haven’t picked up on it yet, green is my favorite color and I’m anxious to transform my bedroom into a verdant paradise.  Or, to quote Florence Welch, “I can’t help but pull the earth around me to make my bed.”

Thus far, the only thing I’ve nailed down is the wall color, Benjamin Moore’s Palm Trees.

Decorating with Green | Motley Decor

It looks a bit dull in this photo, but it’s magical in the sunlight and, at night, it reflects lamplight with equal grace.  I chose it using my fool-proof system.  Learn how to choose the right paint color in my previous post.

Serenity Blue Decor

When Pantone announced that 2016 would have two official colors, there was no directive that the two had to be used in concert.  So, if you’re more of a “blue person” than a “pink person”, consider these items for your serenity blue decor…

Serenity blue decor | Motley Decor | Dining Chair

This dining chair from Pier1 has a mid century vibe and beautiful (serenity) blue linen upholstery.  It’s clean lines would compliment a motley of styles.

Handmade mug & saucer | Serenity Blue Decor on Motley Decor

Slathered in a serenity blue drip glaze, this mug and saucer by Seva Art is handmade and just beautiful.  It’s ok to leave out dirty dishes when they’re this pretty.

Coral sculpture | Motley Decor | Shopping: Serenity Blue Decor

Leave it to Williams Sonoma to create a coral sculpture this life-like–and in serenity blue nonetheless!

Metallic blue wallpaper & more serenity blue decor on Motley Decor

Reminiscent of tea paper or foxed mirrors, this wallpaper boasts a metallic sheen with a tinge of blue.  It would look incredible in a dining room or on any ceiling.

Ombre curtains | Serenity Blue Decor on Motley Decor

I don’t know about you, but I am far from over the ombre trend–especially when it comes to dip dyed curtains.  Hanging a pair like this close to the ceiling and letting them pool on the floor a little would add height and drama to a room–not to mention a pop of serenity.

Dried globe thistles | Serenity Blue Decor Ideas | Motley Decor

Globe thistles naturally bloom in a vibrant blue-violet shade.  Dried, the color softens to a pale blue with just a hint of lavender.  So, not only is the color perfect for serenity blue decor, but these botanical beauties don’t need water and will last for years.

Leather bound vintage books | Ideas for incorporating serenity blue on Motley Decor

Weathered leather takes on a certain charm in dusty blues.  This collection of vintage books–in serenity blue–provides another means for adding serene shades of blue to a room.

 

Shopping Finds in Rose Quartz

Rose quartz, one of Pantone’s two colors of 2016, inspires endless options in the world of decorating.  Color pyschology tells us that pink is calming, tranquil.  Understandably, many of us seek to achieve that sort of atmosphere in our homes.  If you’ve climbed aboard the rose quartz bandwagon, here are some exceptional finds to consider as you decorate.

Shopping for Rose Quartz Decor | Motley Decor

There’s something about the way light filters through pink (or rose quartz) vintage glassware that is just undeniably beautiful.   This 8-piece vanity set that I found on etsy is no exception.  It would be gorgeous displayed on a vanity or even a bathroom counter.

Shopping for Rose Quartz | Velvet | Motley Decor

Velvet is another material that makes me weak in the knees when it takes on a rosy hue.  This throw pillow from Layla Grace shimmers in rose quartz.

Shopping for Rose Quartz Decor

Rose gold, rose quartz’s sister is also having a moment and–like sisters–the two belong together.  The geometric design of this table is a foil to the feminine finish, making for an unexpected statement piece.  Available at Gilt.

Shopping finds in rose quartz | Motley Decor

Few things can rival the romance of candlelight.  And, whether it’s a pressed glass candlestick or a gilded sconce, colored taper candles are a subtle but lovely to inject color into a room.  Why not try these?

Wallpaper & other finds in rose quartz | Motley Decor

How fun is this tiger damask wallpaper in rose quartz?  It would be stunning in a powder room, bedroom, or walk-in closet.  Design by Nouveau Bohemian via Spoonflower.

Shopping for Rose Quartz decor on Motley Decor

This art print could add a little edge to a pink room, while blending in at the same time.  Discovered on 1stdibs.

Rose gold mirror & other rose quartz pink finds on Motley Decor

I couldn’t resist adding one more rose gold item to this list after stumbling across this awesome mirror on JonathanAdler.com.  It feels unapologetically glamorous with an updated Art Deco vibe.  Who wouldn’t want to gussy up in front of this?

Decor in Emerald & Citrine

A week later, I still can’t get over Gloria Windsor’s office in Mozart in the Jungle.   The combination of emerald and citrine is utterly enchanting and I’ve been looking for ways to incorporate the two jewel tones into my own home.  Here are some of my favorite emerald and citrine discoveries thus far…

Decor in Emerald & Citrine

Clockwise: Vintage orange wine goblets found on etsy, Pompeii pillow from ZGallerie, malachite inspired side table from Dot & Bo, teal ginger jar via Chairish, citrine candle holder available at Amazon, overdyed green rug at Overstock.

 

Older posts

© 2017 MotleyDecor.com

Theme by Anders NorenUp ↑